Lumière Brothers

Danse Serpentine (1896)

Lumière & Company (1995)

David Lynch
Peter Greenaway
Wim Wenders

Lumière and Company (1995, original title "Lumière et compagnie") was a collaboration between 41 international film directors in which each made a short film using the original Cinématographe camera invented by the Lumière brothers.

Shorts were edited in-camera and abided by three rules:
  1. A short may be no longer than 52 seconds
  2. No synchronized sound
  3. No more than three takes

BIO: The Lumière brothers, Auguste Marie Louis Nicolas (19 October 1862, Besançon, France – 10 April 1954, Lyon) and Louis Jean (5 October 1864, Besançon, France – 6 June 1948, Bandol), are credited to be first filmmakers in history. They patented the cinematograph, which contrary to Edison's "peepshow" kinetoscope, the former allowed viewing by multiple parties at once, like current cinema. Their first film, Sortie de l'usine Lumière de Lyon, shot in 1894, is considered the first real motion picture in history. Curiously, their surname, "Lumière", is French for "light".